Friday, August 17, 2007

17 units of housing to be built on knollwood road

17 units of housing are being built on Knollwood Road (near the library). 2 of the units will be affordable. The application to build the homes was submitted in 2000 (zoning changes requested). The Planning Board granted approval for Princewood development to build the homes on October 4, 2006.

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

Excellent. New tax revenue for Greenburgh Central Schools, and hopefully new students to boost the declining enrollments. Great location for public transportation, too.

Any other new housing and/or commericial construction going on in the GC school district?

Anonymous said...

This is great,how about some more decvelopment at Taxter ridge and Harts park.We need more revenue to help our tax structure.

Anonymous said...

The more housing the better it will be for the residents. We do have too much parkland,doing nothing.It's not a greener Greenburgh it's a messy and wasteful Greenburgh.

Anonymous said...

What about encouraging the property owners along the blighted section of Central Park Avenue to build some condos on their vacant properties.

Anonymous said...

Hey, per Bernstein's formal ethics complaint, has anyone figured out the amount Feiner's collected for this little assist to a developer?

Anonymous said...

This application took 7 years to complete-from start to construction.

Anonymous said...

You're so concerned with "affordable" housing - yet you seem to have no interest in housing for seniors.
Seniors need affordable, well-designed housing, unless you're more interested in catering to a particular community.
How about showing some initiative in this area?

Anonymous said...

Affordable housing, senior housing, whatever ... It would be great for the town to encourage more taxables, particularly on vacant land and properties in the 100-119 areas - plenty of reliable transportation and retail, plus a boost for Greenburgh Central School District's budget.

Anonymous said...

A nice apartment complex would go good on The property where Barnes and Noble stood.
One can say affordable houses would be great,or part of the complex for senior citizens.
Good location to the stores, bus and train services.
Someone should talk to the owner to consider this great change.

Mad as Hell and Not Taking It Anymore said...

All this stuff about affordable housing, senior housing etc. runs absolutely AGAINST the creation of additional taxable properties - something the Supervisor and his anonymous stooge at 12:38 don't get. What makes Greenburgh soooo expensive are the property taxes - starting with the School District and running through the Town, the County, the Fire District, the sewer district, the drainage district, the park district and finally the dumbdumb district in which you reside. Affordable (including senior) housing is made so by eliminating or significantly reducing the property taxes for one or more of the districts. The Town's usual choice is to grant a PILOT (that's Payment In Lieu Of Taxes) and charge the developer/owner a flat rate - which is taken as revenue in the "A" budget. The school district gets screwed because it collects NO tax revenues but gets to educate the kids (and there are always kids Hal, even in "senior" housing - btw sorry you had such an inept matrimonial attorney) anyhow. The Fire district gets to provide "first responder" EMS services, but again, no revenues. The County has told the Town that it will accept nothing less than its fair share - which it deems to be every penny of it's share of the assessible. As Caratazzolo pointed out recently in an impressively researched document, the water and sewer districts haven't a clue which properties are assessible, let alone how much to charge them - so they scarcely count...
In the grand old Town of Greenburgh, "affordable" and "taxable" are antithetical concepts.

Anonymous said...

Well, I guess I'm the "anonymous stooge at 12:38" (even though I've never even met the supervisor) who made you "mad as hell." I'm no Dr. Phil, but I can tell you're angry about more than this. I just thought it would be a nice idea to put up something useful like housing on all the empty properties.

Anonymous said...

Surprised that Bernstein didn't try to persuade the council and the developer to deed the property to him, like he did with One Dromore?

Anonymous said...

Bernstein and McNally still have time to MAKE A DEAL.

Anonymous said...

affordable housing is exactly what greenburgh does not need!!! Are schools are bad enough, we need commercial properties that are going to supply more revenues for Central 7, and ease the tax burden on the middle class.

Anonymous said...

one can still have affordable housing plus commercial income. You have stores street level and housing above. What's wrong with that, I'll tell you Edgemont would definitly put the screws on anything to be built. If they can't have it their way no one can have it neither.Bernstein and McNally rule over all town matters,and with the exitisting four board members they have all the support that they need.

Anonymous said...

Dear Anonymous at 4:02 -
In a better world your suggestion for shops below and housing above (sometimes called "mixed use")would be ideal. Sadly, the economic reality is that developers do not want mixed use because it adds very significantly to the cost of building. It is cheap to build a "strip mall" - bulldoze a convenient lot, trench out for utilities (if you are in a progressive community which requires the burying of electric as well as gas, water and sewer lines), put in a foundation of little more than cinderblocks and a concrete floor. Put in a plain skeleton and rent "raw space" - or sell to an investor who hires a management company to rent out the space for him. The space can be enormous - and the cost of building each additional square foot decreases the average cost per usable foot until you get to some incredibly big space. Unfortunately, building a place where people will actually like to live is more complicated. At the very least one needs to provide actual rooms, with floor plans. Additonal stories of building height require elevators, fire stairs, incremental heating, ventilation and air-conditioning. In a commercial project those costs are frequently borne by the tenants - in a residential building they almost never are, and in an "affordable" building they are most certainly not paid for by the tenants prior to occupancy.
Good idea for Mayberry RFD in the immediate post Civil War era - unworkable in a post 9/11 world.

Anonymous said...

Guess the developer didn't know how to expedite his application...

Anonymous said...

More Journal News Views!

Greenburgh needs Feiner as supervisor

My family and friends are worried. We want Paul Feiner back in office as our town supervisor. He does an excellent job. He tries hard and has been very helpful to our community.

What will happen to the Theodore Young Community Center if he is not in office? What will happen to our health center? What will happen to the parks department if Paul Feiner is not our supervisor? What will happen to all of us when we have problems demanding the attention of our public officials?

My family and I have lived on Dobbs Ferry Road for many years, near the health center. We did not have health insurance, and it was a blessing to have the health center help. Thank you, Paul. My children spent many years at the Theodore Young Community Center. Thank you, Paul.

I have a travel and recreation soccer program for 200 children. The school where we played closed their fields for whatever reason. I wrote to Paul and he helped. Today we use our Greenburgh town fields. Thank you, Paul. And he will do the same for football, baseball, basketball or any other sport for children.

Paul Feiner knows our community better than anyone. He appreciates our concerns. He solves our problems. He does a good job. Please vote for him in the Democratic primary on Sept. 18.

Carlos Cardenas

Greenburgh

Feiner always available for residents
I moved to the Town of Greenburgh in May of 1989. That year I started getting involved with the Central Park Avenue Civic Association and was assigned as a project to evaluate some of the traffic problems. I called my local legislator, Paul Feiner, and left him a message to give me a call back.

That night he called back to address our concerns and I was so surprised that he would have called me back so quickly and took time out of his evening to speak with me. I know Paul for 18 years and for the 18 years I know him no other way. He will find the time to address important issues. Has no problem calling or meeting with you at your convenience. And he will do anything in his power to do the right thing for people in need and communities that need the help.

Take it from someone who knows Paul well - a vote for Paul Feiner is a vote that will keep Greenburgh a place where you want to live.

Mark Tenzer

Hartsdale

Paul Feiner cares about people
I stopped voting in 1963 - after President Kennedy got shot. I became disillusioned with politics, politicians and our process.

This year I decided to re-register to vote. I'm voting for Paul Feiner for Greenburgh town supervisor. Paul has made me a believer in our government. He cares. He listens. He helps. He's concerned abut me and my neighbors. He's responsive.

I live at 200 Beacon Hill Drive in Dobbs Ferry. We were experiencing a problem with our landlord earlier this year. I called Paul and he responded immediately and effectively. What more can voters want?

Harry Stone

Dobbs Ferry

Feiner spoke out on Darfur crisis
In a campaign piece they sent to Greenburgh voters, Town Board members Eddie Mae Barnes and Steve Bass include as evidence of "Real Democratic Leadership," that they are responsible for Greenburgh's Jan. 10 call for the U.S. to take action to stop the genocide in Darfur. That is admirable - the suffering people of Darfur need all the help they can get.

But, it was Greenburgh Town Supervisor Paul Feiner who, on April 30, 2006, (while the Greenburgh Democratic organization was busying itself with a fundraising luncheon for Richard Brodsky), traveled to Washington, D.C. on a bus with other Greenburgh citizens to meet up with the nearly 50,000 other people on the National Mall to demand that our government increase its efforts to bring an end to the atrocities the Darfuris are forced to endure. Paul's personal commitment to this cause has been, and continues to be, an inspiration to those involved in the struggle.

Roberta M. Roos

Dobbs Ferry